'RAIN'

 

2015

Inspired by continuity in spite of unfavourable conditions. The V2 was developed for riding through the night and/or rain. This iteration came with added reflective stripes & large decals and patterns for visibility. The kit was complimented by a RAIN & WINDPROOF CONVERTIBLE JACKET.

While the raindrops were less visible at night or from afar, the pattern would be easily noticed during the day, which played into the brand's ethos of having devil in the details; finer things that aren't noticed by most, but appreciated by the discerning few. 'NCTRNS' was a word play on 'The Nocturnes', a term coined for cyclists (or anyone) that found themselves motivated & productive under the cover of darkness

Subtle 'Raindrops' served as a backdrop pattern for the V2. random, gradual placements emulated actual rainfall, while 'Arctic' Camouflage was used a complementary. Dedicating a large left panel of the bibs to 'Arctic' Camouflage served as a hi-contrast visibility perk. 

Instead of running a large reflective strip down the back, vertical type in stark white was instead used for visibility & branding. A triple Penrose Triangle OUTLINED ON THE REAR PANEL added a graphic play - A NOD TO THE perception of the impossible ie: Riding through harsh conditions.


'RAin' JACKET

 

2016

Released as an accompaniment to the V2, the Rain Jacket was crafted from Wind & Waterproof fabric, along with removable sleeves & a large rear pocket to store the sleeves in. ZIPPERED SLEEVES ALLOWed the rider to unzip certain portions for ventilation, or to dry up when the conditions improve.

While the V2 came with vertical text down the rear, the jacket came with text on the left arm, to aid visibility. Heavy contrasting panels, vertical texts and 3M reflective stripes ensured high visibility whilst running or cycling at night.

Not only as sporting gear but also functioning a casual streetwear piece, the graphic heavy jacket was crafted to feel suitable for both bike & everyday usage. while dots and vectors added to the aesthetics, but also served as heavy contrasting visuals to enable the user to stand out noticeably for a safe journey.